Archive for the 'odd' Category

30
May
09

Prince Zimboo: Diplo’s Major Lazer Collaborator, Husband to 999 Wives, And Hip-hop’s African Borat?

So who is he? In all likelihood, Prince Zimboo is the alter ego of Jamaican dance-hall producer Asanney “Asani” Morris. An embedded video on Zimboo’s MySpace page reveals this in passing, although the video was made by documentarians visiting Jamaica who might have gotten it wrong—in interviews and raps, Zimboo refers to Asani as his friend. (In a twist that adds to the artsy intrigue, one of Zimboo’s champions is the Jamaican photographer Peter Dean Rickards, who published pictures that purported to unmask definitively the elusive British street artist Banksy).

Assuming Morris is the man behind the dashiki, it’s hard to say precisely what he’s up to. But maybe Prince Zimboo is something like the African Borat, a character who exemplifies and satirizes stereotypes of Otherness for laughs. From his purposely vague biography (one moment he says he lives in a cave; the next, a palace) to his raps about zebras to his Twitter posts about luxurious camel hides, Zimboo offers a milewide caricature of primitivism. And like Borat, with his “sexy time!” and “jagshemash!,” Prince Zimboo has an arsenal of catchphrases that are a delight to imitate: His mantra (“I am looking for wife 1,000”), his courtship advice (“Man have to know how to dress!”), and his truncated cackle (“Heh”) could all make for hit T-shirt slogans, given the right marketing strategy. Of course, Sacha Baron Cohen’s agenda is more pointed. Borat needs rubes whose ignorance he exposes and exploits; with Prince Zimboo, the ruse is much gentler.

What Tami Says: Prince Zimboo is No African Borat

Prince Zimboo fails, in my estimation, because stereotypes about Africa and African people are so pervasive that I reckon too few people will spot the humor. African men live in the jungle surrounded by exotic flora and fauna, wear dashikis, are hyper-sexual and have hundreds of wives? This is different from the popular understanding of the African continent how? Zimboo need only tote an AK-47 and rap about starvation to complete the picture.

Jonah Weiner likens Zimboo to Borat. I disagree that these characters occupy the same space in pop culture. The African stereotype and people’s perceptions of the Central Asian country of Kazhakstan are unequal and not comparable.

Check Zimboo’s Myspace mess here: http://www.myspace.com/zimboomusic

Video mess by the Rickards Bros. : http://www.afflictedyard.com

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20
Apr
09

1966 LSD documentary – audio download

This granddaddy of all LSD documentaries from 1966 sounds even better today. Mocking and hostile attitudes in an understated manner rather than openly confrontational.

Interviews with acid luminaries, regular heads and neutral observers are tied together with narration, musical fragments and weird shit. the peak is reached with an actual trip recording of “Brian”, a hipster acid head who unfortunately happens to have his first bad LSD experience while being recorded (with concealed microphones). The recording is authentic-sounding and either very funny or very scary, depending on your headspace.

LINK
lsd

Just to keep it topical, like ointment….watch your friend and mine, the LSD Lizard while you’re downloading the doco audiofile……

17
Apr
09

Video: Tim and Eric’s “Minivan Highway”

Kraftwerk reforming as a group of middle-aged IT dads from the early ’90s, sexual MIDI files, snazz-based polo shirts!

i know you’ll be keen to download the audio for your next pot-luck-dinner….(do so here you naughty german)

12
Apr
09

Rob Roy – Fur In My Cap

director, Ethan Lader whipped up the “fur in my cap” vid for Rob Roy….the song is ummmm, well you decide, but the video is nuts! Check it out…

also, if you feel so inspired to download the track…jumpt to it “right here”

10
Apr
09

South Park – Kanye West is a gay fish

South Park took on Kanye West last night in a very funny bit about him coming out of the closet as a “gay fish” returning to the sea after struggling to fit in with humans. You can watch the clip here where South Park’s Kanye dives into the ocean to sing an auto-tuned song about “making love to other gay fish” to the tune of “Heartless.”

as the link previously up was pulled due to copyright-wrong-doing…… here’s the whole episode – again, as it’s been removed 3 times… try this link (cursor me gently)

Kanye responded on his blog of course about how he is working on his humility. Not a lower-case character in sight:

SOUTH PARK MURDERED ME LAST NIGHT AND IT’S PRETTY FUNNY. IT HURTS MY FEELINGS BUT WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT FROM SOUTH PARK! I ACTUALLY HAVE BEEN WORKING ON MY EGO THOUGH. HAVING THE CRAZY EGO IS PLAYED OUT AT THIS POINT IN MY LIFE AND CAREER. I USE TO USE IT TO BUILD UP MY ESTEEM WHEN NOBODY BELIEVED IN ME. NOW THAT PEOPLE DO BELIEVE AND SUPPORT MY MUSIC AND PRODUCTS THE BEST RESPONSE IS THANK YOU INSTEAD OF “I TOLD YOU SO!!!” IT’S COOL TO TALK SHIT WHEN YOU’RE RAPPING BUT NOT IN REAL LIFE. WHEN YOU MEET LITTLE WAYNE IN PERSON HE’S THE NICEST GUY FOR EXAMPLE. I JUST WANNA BE A DOPER PERSON WHICH STARTS WITH ME NOT ALWAYS TELLING PEOPLE HOW DOPE I THINK I AM. I NEED TO JUST GET PAST MYSELF. DROP THE BRAVADO AND JUST MAKE DOPE PRODUCT. EVERYTHING IS NOT THAT SERIOUS. AS LONG AS PEOPLE THINK I ACT LIKE A BITCH THIS TYPE OF SHIT WILL HAPPEN TO ME. I GOT A LONG ROAD AHEAD OF ME TO MAKE PEOPLE BELIEVE I’M NOT ACTUALLY A HUGE DOUCHE BUT I’M UP FOR THE CHALLENGE. I’M SURE THE WRITERS AT SOUTH PARK ARE REALLY NICE PEOPLE IN REAL LIFE. THANKS FOR TAKING THE TIME TO DRAW MY CREW. THAT WAS PRETTY FUNNY ALSO!! I’M SURE THERE’S GRAMMATICAL ERRORS IN THIS… THAT’S HOW YOU KNOW IT’S ME!

08
Apr
09

Music Coalition wants to rewrite rules of music business

The Future of Music Coalition has released a set of principles that it hopes will govern the distribution of revenues from new models of music sales. The big labels are unlikely to be amused by its ideas. By John Timmer

As revenues from sales of traditional media have plunged, the music business has been looking for alternate ways of making money from its products, including a variety of subscription services, ad-supported streams, and blanket licenses. The focus of these efforts has largely been on how to ensure that revenue gets collected by the industry in general instead of disappearing into the black hole of piracy, but there’s a related issue that doesn’t receive as much attention: how that money gets distributed once it’s collected. In an attempt to highlight this issue, the Future of Music Coalition has released a set of principles for the compensation of musicians. Although the document focuses on money from new distribution models, it reads much more like an effort to rewrite the rules of the entire business.

The FMC calls itself a “research and advocacy organization that seeks a bright future for creators and listeners,” two groups which tend to have contentious relationships with the major record labels. Based on the document and an accompanying explanation, the FMC isn’t a big fan of the labels, either. So, for example, one of the principles calls for the ability of artists to audit the flow of cash related to their works through the record label’s coffers. In explaining this, the FMC states, “Music industry history is full of stories—anecdotal and otherwise—of misleading accounting by copyright owners.”

That’s hardly the only place where the copyright owners get slammed, as the discussion also states that, “the history of the music industry is littered with stories of artists who have not been paid anything for the sales of their recordings.” That appears in the explanation of the first principle, which is that revenue should be “equitably shared” between music’s creators and the copyright holders. Of course, said holders presumably think that the existing system is fair, which explains why a big portion of the document is spent resetting those rules.

The most critical aspect of this probably occurs in the statement on “direct payment.” Here, the principles say that any transfer of revenues to copyright owners are limited to three years. This would eliminate one of the common business practices, in which record companies would pay for recording, distributing, and promoting music, and then count that as a debt that entitled them to recoup their costs from the artists’ share of any profits. Were these principles adopted, the labels would have three years to get their costs back, after which they can write it off. The concept of direct payment is meant to ensure that the labels would never have access to this money in order to take their share past this point.

A lot of the remaining principles focus on the fact that many of the online services get their music through agreements that abstract a lot of the relationship between music and revenue. So, for example, the labels got an equity stake in MySpace in return for providing the contents for MySpace Music. Other bulk catalog licensing deals exist where the value of the license is a bit easier to determine. In either case, those deals are ultimately dependent upon the content produced by artists, and FMC wants to make sure they get their cut. The same goes for money recovered from copyright infringement lawsuits

Many of the other items are a grab bag of artists’ rights issues. So, for example, in a digital distribution model, it should be possible to accurate track precisely what songs are getting played, so there’s no excuse to not have accurate reporting of this, and revenues distributed accordingly. The FMC also doesn’t want independent musicians and minor labels left out of agreements negotiated with the major labels and, as mentioned above, wants to see transparent accounting of the revenues from these agreements, along with a right to audit for artists.

It’s unlikely that artists will get the sorts of rights that the FMC envisions; there are too many entrenched interests involved, and a lot of groups with a financial interest in blocking these proposals from being adopted. Still, the statement of principles is a good reminder that the music business is far from a monolithic entity, and there are many within it that have conflicting goals. As a result, even if one of the new revenue models winds up being successful, that’s unlikely to mean the end of the power struggles.

06
Apr
09

the invisible homeless

In an effort to create awareness of the “invisible” homeless population in Dusseldorf, Germany, local filmmakers projected video of a street scene on a homeless man making him appear transparent.

of course, it would be easy to be mistaken for this….




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